Languages Less Commonly Taught

Languages Less Commonly Taught

Course Code LANG
Languages Offered Anishinaabemowin
Inuktitut
Ki-Swahili
Levels Offered 1st Year Full course list *
Minor Available No
Placement Test Required for students with previous knowledge More details
* Not all courses are offered every term, please check Carleton Central and/or the Public Class Schedule for course availability.

Updates:

When registering, make certain to check the section code closely to ensure that you are registering in the correct language.

Registration Information

Space in language courses is limited.  Register as early as possible.  If the course is full when you attempt to register, please submit a Course Registration Override Request or, if applicable, add your name to a waitlist on Carleton Central.  Click here to learn more about how waitlisting works.

Which languages are offered?

Classes in LANG (Languages less commonly taught) are offered at the first year level: LANG 1010/1020.

* You can find out more about these courses on Carleton Central/Public Class Schedule under the heading “Language Studies.” Please note that course listings are subject to change and not all courses are offered in a given year.  Subject code LANG was previously listed as ALSS.

Anishinaabemowin

  • Dates Offered: * for dates and times check the Public Class Schedule under the subject heading “Language Studies.”

About the Language

Anishinaabemowin is a member of the Algonquian language family and is the third most commonly spoken indigenous language in Canada after Cree and Inuktitut. Spoken with some variation by a number of tribes (Algonquin, Ojibwe, Chippewa, and Odawa), then language was used historically as a trade language throughout the Great Lakes and surrounding river systems.

About the Instructor

“I come from Cape Croker (Neyaashiinigaming), on the Bruce Peninsula, north of Toronto.  I lived until the age of 7 in a log house with no hydro or electricity.  This log house was built by my great grandfather Joseph Akiwenzie, just after Cape Croker was established in the 1850’s.  My grandfather, Peter was one of five sons.  At this young age I was surrounded by the Ojibway language.  Our family was very fortunate as both our parents did not attend residential school.  Both of them were fluent in Ojibway and spoke it to us, up until their deaths.  However, because we had to learn English, our parents did not encourage us to speak Ojibway.  My three brothers, who also grew up in the old log house, were also surrounded by Ojibway speakers, and gained a love and attachment to it.  After working as a civil servant in Toronto for a number of years, I attended Trent University, and received an Honors Degree, in 1990, majoring in Native Studies.  I first learned about the Fiero Writing System, also known as the 2-vowel system from Shirley Williams, who taught Ojibway language at Trent University.  She later encouraged me to become a language teacher.  In 1998, I graduated from Lakehead University, with a Native Language Instructors’ Diploma, receiving First Class Standing.  In 1999, I graduated from Nipissing University with a Bachelor of Education Degree.  Since then I have gained 7 years experience teaching elementary students from JK to Grade 8, as well as teaching at two different high schools.  I also completed three additional qualification courses in Linguistics, Introduction to Native American Linguistics, and Algonquian Linguistics, at Lakehead University.

I believe that learning Anishnaabemowin can be greatly accelerated by understanding its structure, as well as its meaning.  It is essential to understand the root meanings of the words, and then learn the many prefixes and suffixes which give these words various meanings.  Language takes a lifetime to learn, but through effort and determination, I believe Anishnaabemowin can be learned and retained.  Our language has much to offer the world, in the knowledge contained within it.  I thank my parents most of all for passing this language on to us.  Without this background or early “emersion” in the language, I most likely would not be teaching it today.  Our parents loved it because it had a deep meaning and connection to their world view, and especially to their creator, Gzhemnido.”

Inuktitut

  • Dates Offered: * for dates and times check the Public Class Schedule under the subject heading “Language Studies.”

Why learn Inuktitut? Inuktitut is an important indigenous language within Canada, as Inuit continue to make strides in securing it as official within their homelands. Within Nunavut, for example its official status is at the federal level along with French and English – there are legal implications for this that are not so in other regions. Nunavut nonetheless is the largest Inuit region and comprises 20% of Canada’s landmass and 60% of its coastline. Whether your interest is personal, professional or scholarly, by studying Inuktitut you will definitely expand your way of thinking and understanding the North and the world in general.

About the Language

This course is taught in the Kivalliq (Rankin) dialect of Inuktitut but offers an appreciation for variations of Inuktitut across Canada. There are over 35,000 speakers of Inuit language in Canada, covering the entire northern coastline of this vast country (well over 70% of Canada’s total coastline!): Nunavut, Arctic Quebec (Nunavik), MacKenzie Delta (Inuvialuit), and Labrador (Nunatsiavut). 10% of Inuit from these regions now also live in cities and communities outside of Inuit Nunangat (Inuit homelands) to create a vibrant Inuit Diaspora in southern Canada – many with strong commitments to their language. There are a great many opportunities to practice Inuktitut in the Nation’s Capital where the most thriving Inuit community exists. The writing systems used are both syllabics (derived from Cree) and Roman orthography (in Western Nunavut, MacKenzie Delta, and Labrador). The Inuit Cultural Institute’s (ICI) phonetic writing system uses both syllabics and Roman orthography and both are used officially by the Nunavut government. ICI is taught in this course and variations are acknowledged so students are aware of them.

Ki-Swahili

  • Dates Offered: * for dates and times check the Public Class Schedule under the subject heading “Language Studies.”

About the Language

Ki-Swahili is one of a number of Bantu languages spoken in areas of East and Central Africa.  The language is a national or official language of Tanzania, Kenya, Uganda, and Democratic Republic of the Congo and an official working language of the African Union. While Ki-Swahili is African in origin, it has been influenced over centuries by contact with Arabic, Farsi, German, Portuguese, English, and French.  Five to ten million people speak Ki-Swahili as their native language but many more – as many as 100 million – people speak it as a lingua franca. The 2006 Census reports 27,795 Ki-Swahili speakers living in Canada.  Of this group, 2,025 (7%) live in Ottawa. If you have any further questions about the course(s), we invite you to contact the instructor for more information.

About the Instructor

Regina Fupi holds a BA (Hons.) in Language Studies and an MA in Linguistics from the University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. She has taught Swahili language both as a native and a foreign language. As a foreign language, she taught at the University of Dar es Salaam in Tanzania and at Stanford University in the United States.

About the Course

* Also, please be aware that list is currently under development with previews being added over time. If your course preview is not yet available, please check back later.